Overarching projects

Overarching projects

Our global and local environment, as well as our society, are currently undergoing rapid transformation. Conventional planning models for mobility, freight transport and resource management are overstrained by these developments. The consequences are traffic congestion and high levels of air pollution in urban centers on the one hand, and desertification, squalidness and population ageing in the surrounding rural areas on the other. On the basis of state-of-the-art digital technology and statistic-physical modelling, RegioMotion develops high-performance concepts for the interlinking of communication, mobility and transport services that aim to achieve an optimal quality of life and services of general interest in both rural and urban living spaces, while at the same time minimizing individual traffic volumes (project description in German). [more]
Scientists from different of our research groups are contributing to the "Göttingen exploration of Microscale oil reservoir physics - GeoMorph", funded by BP Exploration Operating Company Ltd. [more]
MaxSynBio In Spring 2015, the joint research network "MaxSynBio" on synthetic biology was launched. Its visionary long-term goal is the creation of artificial cells, for which we are investigating the scientific basis. Nine Max Planck institutes and the university of Erlangen-Nuremberg are involved in this network, which is funded by the Max Planch society and the BMBF (German ministry for education and research) for three years. From our department, the group of Oliver Bäumchen is involved in the project. [more]
The Senate of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) established of a new Priority Program “Microswimmers – From Single Particle Motion to Collective Behaviour” (SPP 1726) in 2014. The program is scheduled to run for six years. The major focus of the priority program is the understanding of biological microswimmers, the design and understanding of artificial microswimmers and the cooperative behavior and "swarming" of ensembles of microswimmers. Our research groups around Corinna Maaß and Oliver Bäumchen contribute to the program. [more]
The collaborative research center CRC 937 aims at a quantitative understanding of the physical mechanisms at work when soft and biological matter self-organizes into complex structures to perform dynamic functions such as cell division, cell locomotion or tissue development. With this goal in mind, we plan to analyze the ways, in which macromolecules and cells interact physically, exert forces, respond viscoelastically, move each other, and self-organize into complex functional patterns. [more]
What happens if a droplet moves over solid that is so soft that it gets deformed by the capillary action of the droplet? And what if the solid would also responds to the contacting liquid by changing its surface properties? How would that change the dynamics of wetting or dewetting i.e., the rate at which the drop moves? And wouldn’t it be useful if, by some trick, we could change the surface “on demand” to be water-repellent or not? Nature plays these tricks every day, as in the water-repellent plumage of a kingfisher, or the slippery surface of carnivore plants on which not even insects can grab a hold. Such and similar questions are addressed in the newly established SPP 2171, to which Stefan Karpitschka is serving as a member of the coordination board, and his group is participating in this joint research effort. [more]
The Max Planck-University of Twente Center for Complex Fluid Dynamics is an interdisciplinary platform shared between the MPI for Dynamics and Self-Organization in Göttingen, the MPI for Polymer Research in Mainz, and the University of Twente in Enschede, The Netherlands. Together, we aim to understand the complexities inherent to multi-component fluids on all length scales, from nanoscopic surface interactions to large-scale turbulent flows. The Groups of Stefan Karpitschka and Corinna Maass are participating in the Center, both in the context of Marangoni-driven flows. These flows are popularly known from the “Tears of Wine” effect, and early research dates back even to the 19th century where Carlo Marangoni and James Clerk Maxwell were working on it. Even today we do not understand many aspects of this effect, primarily due to the complex nature of the liquids that show it. Recent technological advances, e.g. in ink-jet printing, are demanding a better knowledge, and, at the same time, bring advancements into tangible reach. [more]
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